Differential Scanning Calorimetry applied to bitumen: Results of the RILEM NBM TG1 Round Robin test.

The application of Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) has been proven useful in characterizing bituminous binders, distillates and crude oils. In this paper, results of the round robin test, organized by the Rilem TC 231 Nanotechnology-based Bituminous Materials (NBM) TG1 group are reported.

Abstract

The application of Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) has been proven useful in characterizing bituminous binders, distillates and crude oils. In this paper, results of the round robin test, organized by the Rilem TC 231 Nanotechnology-based Bituminous Materials (NBM) TG1 group are reported.

The purpose is to investigate the repeatability and reproducibility of standard DSC measurements when applied to bituminous binders. In the full test program of the Rilem NBM group, DSC measurements are further compared to observations made in atomic force microscopy (AFM), AFM measurements are reported in a separate paper. Seven laboratories have participated in this round robin test. Four bituminous binders were investigated, containing various amounts of natural or added wax. The test program consisted of a well-defined isothermal annealing procedure, followed by a first heating and cooling scan, and afterwards followed by a second heating scan. At this stage, the data, as they were reported by the different participants, were compared. For the glass transition (Tg), mid temperatures, can be defined with a reasonable reproducibility, which improves if natural wax is not present. Regarding melting and crystallization, the shape of the melting curve is highly dependent on the thermal history of the samples. Peak temperatures of melting and crystallization phenomena were reported with a good reproducibility, while the reproducibility of melting enthalpies (or surface area’s under the melting and crystallization signals) was not satisfactory. Different reasons for this and recommendations for improving the results are discussed in the paper.

The results of this collaborative project will discussed at the RILEM2013 Symposium, 10-12 June 2013 in Stockholm, Sweden www.rilem2013.org.

Authors

Hilde Soenen1, Jeroen Besamusca2, Lily D. Poulikakos3, Jean-Pascal Planche4, Prabir Das5, Niki Kringos5, James Grenfell6, Emmanuel Chailleux7


1 Nynas NV, Bitumen Research, Noorderlaan 183, 2030 Antwerp, Belgium

2 Kuwait Petroleum R&T, Moezelweg 251, Europoort (RT), The Netherlands

3 Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129,8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland

4 Western Research Institute, 365 North 9th Street, Laramie, WY 82072, USA

5 Highway and Railway Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Brinellvägen 23, 10044 Stockholm, Sweden

6 Nottingham Transportation Engineering Centre, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, United Kingdom

7 Ifsttar, Centre de Nantes, Département Matériaux / Groupe Matériaux pour les Infrastructures de Transports, Route de Bouaye CS4 44344 Bouguenais, France