The green city

The countryside is moving into the city. A slight exaggeration maybe, but it is a fact that green walls and roofs are becoming increasingly common in the urban environment.

A roof covering of moss, sedum, herbs or grass not only makes a colourful addition to the concrete jungle, it also has a positive environmental impact.

As well as the plants absorbing rainwater that evaporates back into the atmosphere, green roofs also dampen the sound level, save energy, reduce the temperature and have air purifying properties. It is a fact that a 10 m2 roof surface of dry vegetation absorbs as much carbon dioxide as a tree.

And let’s not forget biodiversity. Green roofs attract bumblebees, butterflies and other valuable insects, not least bees that play a crucial role as pollinators for agriculture, gardens and flower meadows. Bituminous membranes are used in order to protect the construction from water and roots growing through the material.

Safety

Safety first

‘Get home safely’ was the subject of this autumn's Aggregate Industries Safety Events.

Interview

Planning ahead

The civil engineering industry is pressing for a new Danish infrastructure plan. Many major projects, which will benefit both Denmark and Europe, are dependant on such a plan. Anders Hundahl explains more.

Projects

E18, Norway

After two intensive years, the construction company NCC has finished asphalting the 23 km stretch of the E18 between Arendal and Tvedestrand in southern Norway.

Projects

Storstrøm bridge, Denmark

The Danish State is currently building the new Storstrøm Bridge between Zealand and Falster. The bridge, which is part of the planned Fehmarn Belt link between Denmark and Germany, has a budget of approx. EUR 560 million and will open for traffic in 2022.

Noted

The score for quality is lower

Roberto Crotti, World Economic Forum (WEF), on the state of the European road network.

Interview on the link between roads and competitiveness


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