The green city

The countryside is moving into the city. A slight exaggeration maybe, but it is a fact that green walls and roofs are becoming increasingly common in the urban environment.

A roof covering of moss, sedum, herbs or grass not only makes a colourful addition to the concrete jungle, it also has a positive environmental impact.

As well as the plants absorbing rainwater that evaporates back into the atmosphere, green roofs also dampen the sound level, save energy, reduce the temperature and have air purifying properties. It is a fact that a 10 m2 roof surface of dry vegetation absorbs as much carbon dioxide as a tree.

And let’s not forget biodiversity. Green roofs attract bumblebees, butterflies and other valuable insects, not least bees that play a crucial role as pollinators for agriculture, gardens and flower meadows. Bituminous membranes are used in order to protect the construction from water and roots growing through the material.


Safety comes first

Nynas is actively working with customers and contractors to reach the goal of zero injuries at work.

Talking point

Talking point: The European road network

Three industry experts on the future of Europe's road infrastructure.


Cold mixing on the go

A successful collaboration between Nynas and volumetric concrete mixer manufacturer Armcon has resulted in a mobile patching machine that can produce cold mix asphalt for repairs and maintenance.


Revealing structure

Employing an advanced analysis method, Nynas researchers are starting to unmask the chemical structure of bitumen. Xiaohu Lu explains how TOF-SIMS is used to analyse the surface structure of bitumen.


Investment gaps of more than 20 percent.

The G20’s Global Infrastructure Hub notes in a report that Europe needs to increase road investments by almost USD 1 trillion during 2016–2040.
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