Kiruna, Sweden

Work at the world's largest underground mine has resulted in deformations and crack formations at ground level that are so extensive that parts of the city of Kiruna are having to be relocated. One important project in this transformation is the new 7 km long section of the E10 north of the city.

The Kiruna mine in the far north of Sweden has been operating for more than one hundred years. It is the biggest underground mine in the world, with daily production equivalent to six Eiffel Towers in terms of the volume of steel.

Mining of the gigantic iron ore body takes place at a depth of more than one thousand metres, resulting in deformations and crack formations at ground level that are so extensive that parts of the city of Kiruna are having to be relocated. The urban transformation is in full swing and is expected to be fully complete in 2035, but the new city centre will be in place as early as 2022.

One important project in this transformation is the new 7 km long section of the E10 north of Kiruna. This work, which is divided into two stages, has been under way for several years and is expected to be completed during 2021.

The second stage is being undertaken by the contractor NYAB, with the Swedish Transport Administration as the client. The asphalt is supplied by NCC. Penetration grade bitumen 70/100 and 250/330 are blended to 100/150 and 160/220 in the final asphalt mix.

Safety

Minimising the risk of boil-over

It is extremely important that the driver always makes sure that the tank is free of water or aqueous products before loading bitumen.

Sustainable Development

Nynas invests for reliable production and reduced GHG emissions

Nynas is investing SEK 190 million to secure the supply of bitumen for the Nordic infrastructure. At the same time, carbon dioxide emissions can be reduced by 34%.

Interview

The road to new mobility

An international benchmark study highlights the road industry’s role in the transformation of road infrastructure and the development of new mobility.

Noted

Stop and full speed ahead

On 27 November 2020, after 46 days and 8,000 activities with no accidents and not one single person being infected with COVID-19, a turnaround was completed at the Nynas refinery in Harburg.

Noted

All the key players are working together to achieve the best possible result.

Katri Eskola, Specialist Road Maintenance Finnish Transport Infrastructure Agency

Talking point: The COVID-19 pandemic


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