Norway's new super bridge

The Hålogaland bridge is located 300 km north of the Arctic Circle, and crosses a fjord by the city of Narvik in northern Norway.

 With a free span of 1 145 m the bridge will be one of the longest suspension bridges in Europe when it opens for traffic in the summer of 2018.

With a total length of 1 533 m and an 18 m wide road, this superbridge will need a considerable amount of special asphalt. The paving of the bridge, which starts this spring, will be performed in two separate contracts. One for the two viaducts with a total length of 400 m, which have a concrete surface, and another contract for the road on the suspension span, which is made of steel.

“Here we required two very different recipes and performance methods,” says Erik Sundet from the consultancy company Cowi. “For the concrete surface we need two layers of PMB A34 (80 mm), while the steel surface requires the use of a water-resistant membrane (80 mm).”

Safety

Safety first

‘Get home safely’ was the subject of this autumn's Aggregate Industries Safety Events.

Interview

Planning ahead

The civil engineering industry is pressing for a new Danish infrastructure plan. Many major projects, which will benefit both Denmark and Europe, are dependant on such a plan. Anders Hundahl explains more.

Projects

E18, Norway

After two intensive years, the construction company NCC has finished asphalting the 23 km stretch of the E18 between Arendal and Tvedestrand in southern Norway.

Projects

Storstrøm bridge, Denmark

The Danish State is currently building the new Storstrøm Bridge between Zealand and Falster. The bridge, which is part of the planned Fehmarn Belt link between Denmark and Germany, has a budget of approx. EUR 560 million and will open for traffic in 2022.

Noted

The score for quality is lower

Roberto Crotti, World Economic Forum (WEF), on the state of the European road network.

Interview on the link between roads and competitiveness


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