Hot roads in the winter

Tests have been conducted on vulnerable road sections using waste heat from district heating plants to get rid of the ice.

Ice and frost are major issues on winter roads in Northern Europe. This is especially true for roads with steep slopes, viaducts and bridges. Tests have been conducted on vulnerable road sections using waste heat from district heating plants to get rid of the ice. And now another step is being taken through a project initiated by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, with financial support from the Swedish Transport Administration and the Norwegian Public Roads Administration.

The method is based on a ground-source heat pump system, which stores heat in the bedrock, applying the same principle as when heating a building. But as a road has a much greater surface area than a building, it is a matter of being able to supply enough energy for the ground-source heat.

The solution currently being tested involves utilising the solar radiation from the summer months. The heat on the surface of the road heats a liquid circulating in pipes, which are installed in the base course if it is an asphalt pavement. When the pipes pass the ground heat well, the surrounding rock is heated up. The energy is then stored in the rock and used during the winter by pumping the heat back to the road.

“Another positive effect is that the road is cooled down when you capture the heat during the summer, which can reduce the risk of deformation and bleeding,” says Jan-Erik Lundmark, Senior Advisor Road Maintenance, the Swedish Transport Administration.

Noted

Nynas exits US sanctions

The US Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Asset Control (OFAC) announced today that Nynas is no longer being blocked pursuant to the Venezuela Sanctions Regulations. As a result of a corporate restructuring of the ownership of Nynas AB sanctions are lifted, and US persons and companies no longer require an authorization from OFAC to engage in transactions or activities with Nynas AB. As a consequence, general license GL 13E is removed.

Sustainable Development

Asphalt – a circular material

The reuse of asphalt is one area where the bitumen and asphalt industries contribute to a more sustainable utilisation of our natural resources.

Projects

Rising to the challenge

Playing a key part of the supply chain for a huge road project in England, Nynas delivered more than 20,000 tons of bitumen in time-critical batches, helping to complete the work well ahead of schedule.

Interview

New directions

Increased traffic volumes, digitalisation and an ageing road network are placing greater demands on the road transport system. Director General Lena Erixon discusses how the Swedish Transport Administration is facing today’s challenges with an eye on the future.

Noted

The score for quality is lower

Roberto Crotti, World Economic Forum (WEF), on the state of the European road network.

Interview on the link between roads and competitiveness


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