Hot roads in the winter

Tests have been conducted on vulnerable road sections using waste heat from district heating plants to get rid of the ice.

Ice and frost are major issues on winter roads in Northern Europe. This is especially true for roads with steep slopes, viaducts and bridges. Tests have been conducted on vulnerable road sections using waste heat from district heating plants to get rid of the ice. And now another step is being taken through a project initiated by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, with financial support from the Swedish Transport Administration and the Norwegian Public Roads Administration.

The method is based on a ground-source heat pump system, which stores heat in the bedrock, applying the same principle as when heating a building. But as a road has a much greater surface area than a building, it is a matter of being able to supply enough energy for the ground-source heat.

The solution currently being tested involves utilising the solar radiation from the summer months. The heat on the surface of the road heats a liquid circulating in pipes, which are installed in the base course if it is an asphalt pavement. When the pipes pass the ground heat well, the surrounding rock is heated up. The energy is then stored in the rock and used during the winter by pumping the heat back to the road.

“Another positive effect is that the road is cooled down when you capture the heat during the summer, which can reduce the risk of deformation and bleeding,” says Jan-Erik Lundmark, Senior Advisor Road Maintenance, the Swedish Transport Administration.

Projects

Road maintenance, Finland

The Finish road network has a total length of 454,000 km. The State-maintained section – 78,000 km – consists of main roads class I and II, motorways and regional and connecting roads. In 2019, approximately 1,800 km of the State-maintained road network were repaved.

Projects

Kiruna, Sweden

Work at the world's largest underground mine has resulted in deformations and crack formations at ground level that are so extensive that parts of the city of Kiruna are having to be relocated. One important project in this transformation is the new 7 km long section of the E10 north of the city.

Research

The bitumen laboratory in Nynäshamn

The Nynas bitumen laboratory – BitTech – plays a key role in offering the best technical solutions in close collaboration with customers. Carl Hultin explains more.

Noted

Nynas successfully exits reorganisation

The District Court of Södertörn has decided that the Nynas company reorganisation is now complete, following a creditors meeting where the previously submitted composition proposal was accepted.

Noted

The score for quality is lower

Roberto Crotti, World Economic Forum (WEF), on the state of the European road network.

Interview on the link between roads and competitiveness


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