Kiruna, Sweden

Work at the world's largest underground mine has resulted in deformations and crack formations at ground level that are so extensive that parts of the city of Kiruna are having to be relocated. One important project in this transformation is the new 7 km long section of the E10 north of the city.

03.12.20

The Kiruna mine in the far north of Sweden has been operating for more than one hundred years. It is the biggest underground mine in the world, with daily production equivalent to six Eiffel Towers in terms of the volume of steel.

Mining of the gigantic iron ore body takes place at a depth of more than one thousand metres, resulting in deformations and crack formations at ground level that are so extensive that parts of the city of Kiruna are having to be relocated. The urban transformation is in full swing and is expected to be fully complete in 2035, but the new city centre will be in place as early as 2022.

One important project in this transformation is the new 7 km long section of the E10 north of Kiruna. This work, which is divided into two stages, has been under way for several years and is expected to be completed during 2021.

The second stage is being undertaken by the contractor NYAB, with the Swedish Transport Administration as the client. The asphalt is supplied by NCC. Penetration grade bitumen 70/100 and 250/330 are blended to 100/150 and 160/220 in the final asphalt mix.