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08/01/2019 11:53

Tyre labels in Chinese

China has decided to gradually introduce uniform tyre labelling.

The EU introduced a ban on highly aromatic oils in 2010, which was followed by labelling requirements in 2012 to provide consumers with better information about a tyre’s breaking performance and rolling resistance, which are key to safety and environmental performance.

China has decided to gradually introduce uniform labelling as well. The Chinese labelling system is voluntary in 2017, but will become mandatory as of 2018.

Intensive work is under way to develop better tyres with less environmental impact. Research has shown that Nynas’ oils can contribute low rolling resistance in tyres and consequently improve labelling rates.

  

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