Asphalt – a circular material

The reuse of asphalt is one area where the bitumen and asphalt industries contribute to a more sustainable utilisation of our natural resources.

Asphalt is 100 % reusable! There are many positive sustainability effects from increasing the circularity of asphalt roads. When incorporating greater proportions of reclaimed asphalt, we save on virgin raw materials such as bitumen and aggregates, some of which might have to be transported over long distances. This in turn has the potential to save on emissions from transportation.

The proportion of available reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) that is reused rather than put into landfill is therefore on the increase everywhere. The way to extract the most value from reclaimed asphalt pavement is to use it in the bound layers in the road. When using it in the unbound layers, as merely a replacement for aggregate, the performance and financial value of the bitumen in RAP is not captured at all.

If we take a look at the statistics published by the European Asphalt Pavement Association (EAPA), it is clear that the trend is heading in the right direction. From 2001 to 2018, the average proportion of available RAP being reused in hot- or warm mix asphalt has increased from about 25 % to about 60 %. But it is also clear that there are major variations between countries as the statistics for 2018 show that this number varied from 12 to 100 %. In most European countries, no RAP is put into landfill and as a whole, asphalt is one of the construction materials that is already meeting EU’s long-term objective that 70% of all construction and demolition material should be reused or recovered.

Nynas supports the increased reuse of asphalt in different ways, from participating in scientific studies to supplying products that allow for increased use of RAP while maintaining the performance of the asphalt mix.

Sustainable Development

Sustainable governance

Eurobitume is carrying out longterm work to help the organisation’s members to prepare for upcoming challenges as the conditions change in the market. One example is the decision to form the Bitumen Sustainability Steering Group (BSSG), chaired by Carl Robertus from Nynas.

Projects

The Ryfylke tunnel, Norway

2013 saw the start of a major construction project – the Ryfylke tunnel, which opened to traffic just in time for the start of the new decade. This is the longest and deepest underground road tunnel in the world – 292 m below sea level – and it forms part of what is known as the Ryfast project.

Noted

Nynas exits US sanctions

The US Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Asset Control (OFAC) announced today that Nynas is no longer being blocked pursuant to the Venezuela Sanctions Regulations. As a result of a corporate restructuring of the ownership of Nynas AB sanctions are lifted, and US persons and companies no longer require an authorization from OFAC to engage in transactions or activities with Nynas AB. As a consequence, general license GL 13E is removed.

Projects

Rising to the challenge

Playing a key part of the supply chain for a huge road project in England, Nynas delivered more than 20,000 tons of bitumen in time-critical batches, helping to complete the work well ahead of schedule.

Noted

The score for quality is lower

Roberto Crotti, World Economic Forum (WEF), on the state of the European road network.

Interview on the link between roads and competitiveness


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