Why electric road systems?

One important factor in the development of the roads of the future is the requirement for reduced CO2 emissions, especially from heavy goods vehicles (HGV). According to consultancy firm WSP, it could be possible for two thirds of HGV transport activities in Sweden to take place on electric road systems by 2030.

Sweden is a role model in this area. It was back in 2016 that the world’s very first electric section of road for HGVs was created, on the E16 north of Stockholm. A few years later there was a corresponding initiative in Germany.

The focus is on HGVs. This is because the batteries used in private cars do not have sufficient capacity for use in vehicles that have to drive long distances with a heavy load. An electric road system provides even the heaviest vehicles with sufficient power, which is supplemented by standard batteries when the vehicle leaves the road to deliver its load. For Swedish conditions, the Swedish Transport Administration believes that it will be profitable to build electric road systems covering 2-3,000 km of the national road network.

Such a transition requires significant investments in new, powerful electricity grids that can supply power to the major motorways. Another challenge is the fact that a process of expansion is under way across Europe, which in turn requires an international standard defining how electrically powered vehicles are to be charged while driving. Only then can it be possible to transport goods using HGVs from Malaga in the south all the way to North Cape in Norway, without the need to re-fuel.

Projects

Hessen, Germany

During 2020, slip roads to and from motorways all over the federal state of Hessen in Germany have been paved using microsurfacing to improve road grip. Because of the heavy traffic, especially in the Rhine-Main area, the contractors were forced to perform the work largely at night, which posed major challenges for both employees and machines, but also for construction materials.

Projects

The road network, Sweden

More and more car drivers are complaining about the standard of the roads and demanding better maintenance, primarily on the less trafficked road network. And statistics support them. Costs for car repairs associated with poor road conditions are increasing rapidly.

Safety

Minimising the risk of boil-over

It is extremely important that the driver always makes sure that the tank is free of water or aqueous products before loading bitumen.

Sustainable Development

Nynas invests for reliable production and reduced GHG emissions

Nynas is investing SEK 190 million to secure the supply of bitumen for the Nordic infrastructure. At the same time, carbon dioxide emissions can be reduced by 34%.

Noted

All the key players are working together to achieve the best possible result.

Katri Eskola, Specialist Road Maintenance Finnish Transport Infrastructure Agency

Talking point: The COVID-19 pandemic


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