Why electric road systems?

One important factor in the development of the roads of the future is the requirement for reduced CO2 emissions, especially from heavy goods vehicles (HGV). According to consultancy firm WSP, it could be possible for two thirds of HGV transport activities in Sweden to take place on electric road systems by 2030.

Sweden is a role model in this area. It was back in 2016 that the world’s very first electric section of road for HGVs was created, on the E16 north of Stockholm. A few years later there was a corresponding initiative in Germany.

The focus is on HGVs. This is because the batteries used in private cars do not have sufficient capacity for use in vehicles that have to drive long distances with a heavy load. An electric road system provides even the heaviest vehicles with sufficient power, which is supplemented by standard batteries when the vehicle leaves the road to deliver its load. For Swedish conditions, the Swedish Transport Administration believes that it will be profitable to build electric road systems covering 2-3,000 km of the national road network.

Such a transition requires significant investments in new, powerful electricity grids that can supply power to the major motorways. Another challenge is the fact that a process of expansion is under way across Europe, which in turn requires an international standard defining how electrically powered vehicles are to be charged while driving. Only then can it be possible to transport goods using HGVs from Malaga in the south all the way to North Cape in Norway, without the need to re-fuel.

Noted

Bitumen to focus on core European markets

The world is changing at a rapid pace, and Nynas is now taking strategic steps to strengthen its competitiveness in core markets. Nynas will create a business footprint focusing on customers in the naphthenics and bitumen market in Europe, and significantly improve efficiency to deliver a competitive customer experience. Furthermore, Nynas will focus on four strategic sustainability areas: product development, environment and climate change, health and safety as well as people and society.

Safety

Appreciated Safety Day in Norway

To minimise the risk of accidents and injuries when loading and unloading bitumen, Nynas holds annual driver meetings.

Interview

Brains of Nynas: Sarah Badley

Sarah Badley works as Bitumen Sales Manager, covering the North of England, but is also responsible for the Nynas Bitumen Customer Service Centre in the UK. She joined Nynas in 2014, having spent many years working in the motor industry with brands including Porsche, Mercedes-Benz and BMW. Find out what's on her mind.

Noted

Natural bitumen in the Tower of Babel

Researchers have been able to show that bricks in the mighty tower were bonded with natural bitumen

Noted

All the key players are working together to achieve the best possible result.

Katri Eskola, Specialist Road Maintenance Finnish Transport Infrastructure Agency

Talking point: The COVID-19 pandemic


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